Miscellaneous Paintings of Early Colonial Artists

"View in Bengal"

“View in Bengal”, lithograph, Charles D’Oyly (1828).

"A Ghaut at Patna"

“A Ghaut at Patna”, lithograph, Charles D’Oyly (1828).

"The Palace of the late Nabob of Arcot, Madras"

“The Palace of the late Nabob of Arcot, Madras”, aquatint, Francis Swain Ward (1803).

"A View in the North Street of Fort St. George"

“A View in the North Street of Fort St. George”, aquatint, Francis Swain Ward (1803). Fort St. George was the headquarter of the East India Company in Madras, and this sketch is a rare view of daily life inside its precincts.

"A View Within the Walls of a Pagoda, Madras"

“A View Within the Walls of a Pagoda, Madras”, aquatint, Francis Swain Ward (1803).

"The Old Court House, Calcutta"

“The Old Court House, Calcutta”, aquatint, Francis Swain Ward (1803).

"The Tomb of a Moorish Lady, Bengal"

“The Tomb of a Moorish Lady, Bengal”, aquatint, Francis Swain Ward (1803).

"A View of the Opposite or Sulkhea Side"

“A View of the Opposite or Sulkhea Side,” from Views of Calcutta and its Environs (1824) by James Baillie Fraser. The sketch depicts not merely the “opposite” side of Salkia (opposite when seen from the Fort William side), but also the approach of a particularly virulent Nor’wester. Such storms often caused incalculable damage to the nascent British establishment, and their approach occasioned much apprehension among them.

"View of the St Andrew's Church from Mission Row"

“View of the St Andrew's Church from Mission Row”, coloured engraving, James Baillie Fraser (1824).

"A View of the Loll Bazar, Opposite John Palmer's House"

“A View of the Loll Bazar, from Opposite the House of John Palmer”, coloured engraving, James Baillie Fraser (1824).

"A View of the Black Pagoda on the Chitpore Road"

“A View of the Black Pagoda on the Chitpore Road”, coloured engraving, James Baillie Fraser (1824).

"Lord Cornwallis Receiving the Hostage Princes"

“Lord Cornwallis Receiving the Hostage Princes,” oil on canvas, Mather Brown, 1793. This painting commemorates the surrender of Tipu Sultan’s sons to the British during the Anglo-Mysore Wars. At a time when the camera was yet to be invented, imperial painters were often commissioned to prepare grand paintings of significant political/ diplomatic events, thereby freezing in time a moment which was perceived to be of particular significance for the British Empire.

"Portrait of Peshwa Madhav Rao II"

Portrait of Peshwa Madhav Rao II, oil on canvas, James Wales (1792). Wales, a Scottish painter, visited India like many of his compatriots; but instead of confining himself to the Presidency towns, he chose to try his fortune at the court of the Maratha Peshwa. Several Indian rulers during the late 18th century, including those of Awadh and the Carnatic, were dazzled by the kind of royal self-fashioning made possible by European-style portrait painting, and they paid enormous sums to have their portraits prepared.